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How to Keep Nuisance Flies Away from your Chickens

The hot summer is around the corner.  That being the case, the flies are going to start becoming a problem around the chicken coop.  We have discovered that the best way to get rid of the flies is to stop them from breeding.  

While you’re never going to get rid of ALL of them, you can do a good job decreasing the population, especially if you have just a few chickens.  Studies show that if you get rid of flies in your chicken coop, Campylobacter is less likely to spread, keeping you, your family, and your flock healthier. 

Luckily, keeping flies away from your chicken coop is easier than it seems as long as you follow a few critical steps. While there’s a lot of ideas in this article, I think the basis of any program to control flies is to start with a clean chicken coop. Without that critical first step, you’re just managing a situation that will eventually overwhelm you. You also might need to use more than one idea on this list—I’ve found preventing flies from returning takes a couple different plans of attack.

That being said, here’s ideas to get you started to get rid of flies in your chicken coop!

Keep your chicken coop clean

Keeping your flock’s home clean will go a long way to helping you get rid of flies in your chicken coop.  Flies like manure, muck, food, and whatever else they can find in chicken coops.If you make sure your hens’ home is relatively manure and crud free, less flies will be attracted to it. 

To clean your chicken coop:

1. Use a rake to remove soiled bedding, old hay from nesting boxes, etc. Sweep out whatever debris is left.

2. Use plain water or water and citrus vinegar mixture with a scrub brush to get rid of any manure that might be hanging around your chicken coop.

3. Wear rubber gloves, because this step can get kind of messy and with all the bacteria in your chickens’ digestive systems, you don’t want it getting on you.

4. Finally, top everything off with a mint essential oil spray to kill bacteria and repel flies.

When cleaning your chicken coop, do not use bleach at all.  Bleach combined with the ammonia from their manure can create poisonous fumes. All natural is best in this case to get rid of flies in your chicken coop.

Make sure, as well, that you’re removing old feed, since food attracts flies.

One study showed that flies might transmit avian flu.  Get rid of flies in your chicken coop to keep your flock healthy.

Use all-natural fly repellent

Repellent is a pretty no-brainer way to get rid of flies in your chicken coop, but going all-natural is again your best option.

You’ve taken all these steps to limit your flock’s chemical exposure already. Don’t drop the ball at the last minute and go with something laden with them.





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