We have recently changed our hours on Friday from 8am - 3pm. Thank You!

Learning and Growing

One of the most rewarding experiences a farmer can have is sitting down to a meal that they have prepared in the most literal, right-from-the-start way.  They get the pride of knowing that they worked for every scrap of food on their plate, the joy of a truly fresh and delicious meal, and the comfort of understanding exactly from where everything of which they are partaking has come. They know if the vegetables were raised in a right and natural way.  They know if the animals used were treated humanely.  The benefits of building your own sustainable food supply are many and varied.  

Total self-sustainability with food is obviously a pipe dream for most, especially in this age of supermarkets drive thru's, but that doesn’t mean that we have to give up on the dream of fresh, from the farm produce and meat.  Many families are discovering the joys of rearing their own animals for food, building pig stys and chicken coops right there on their own property.  They have hams and bacon when needed and eggs every morning.  Even those who can not afford or do not have the space available to grow their own food can become a part of the self-sustaining food pipeline by investing in their local farmers through herdshares, farmers markets and the like. 

There are a number of benefits to eating fresh, farm raised animal products.  Number one on the list, for most people, is the taste.  There is little debate about whether mass-produced meats have less flavor than their home grown counterparts.  Nothing that is coming to you from a large-scale production factory is likely to have the taste, colors, nutrients, and quality that you will find from a smaller business or individual farmer.   Just look at the difference in the vegetables at the grocery store compared to the vibrant, beautiful options you find at the local farmers market. 

Safety is also a benefit of maintaining a local food supply chain, and not just for you but for the animals themselves.  When you truly know where your food comes from--when you can look the farmer in the eye, see the animals, see how they are treated, and know just what sort of food they are being fed--you can rest assured that no creatures were treated inhumanely to produce your dinner.  You can also eat with confidence that you are not ingesting a million random chemicals or preservatives meant to hold in “flavor.”  When you know where your food is coming from, you get to know exactly what you are putting in your body.

Hillsboro Feed Company is the go-to location for any North Alabamians looking to

supply their livestock and work animals with the best, healthiest options for feed. Our staff is imminently professional, friendly, and ready to help you.  Their customer service skills are excellent and the products they can offer are the best available. Visit our store at 14934 Alabama Hwy 20 W, Hillsboro, AL, or call (256) 637-2309 if you have any questions. You can also visit us on the web, at

https://www.hillsborofeedco.com



Also in News

What is Non-GMO?

Non-GMO means non-genetically modified organisms. GMOs (genetically modified organisms), are novel organisms created in a laboratory using genetic modification/engineering techniques. Scientists and consumer and environmental groups have cited many health and environmental risks with foods containing GMOs.
Horses 101

Before you bring your new equine companion home, you'll want to learn about the basics of good horse care. Learn how to feed, house, and care for your horse or pony. Discover how pony care differs from horse care, what good health looks like and when to call the vet.
Going Hog Wild

Raising hogs can lead to some good things.  Most of those things start with the letter “meats” and are spelled “awesome bacon.”  Yes, the food is delicious, and yes it can save you money to raise your own meat animals.  And yes, they can be adorable in their early days.  However, in-between those times, well… you better have an idea of what you are getting yourself into before you start bringing pigs home for the keeping.